Essay Maturity Scout Book Kill Mocking Bird

Classified as a bildungsroman, or a novel concerned with the psychological and moral growth of the protagonist, To Kill a Mockingbird has any number of instances in which Scout demonstrates her maturation.

In Chapter 7 after Jem has torn his pants on the Radleys' fence, he tells Scout that he must retrieve his pants; otherwise, Mr. Nathan Radley will find them in the morning. So, when Jem returns with his pants at 2:00 a.m.,...

Classified as a bildungsroman, or a novel concerned with the psychological and moral growth of the protagonist, To Kill a Mockingbird has any number of instances in which Scout demonstrates her maturation.

In Chapter 7 after Jem has torn his pants on the Radleys' fence, he tells Scout that he must retrieve his pants; otherwise, Mr. Nathan Radley will find them in the morning. So, when Jem returns with his pants at 2:00 a.m., Scout is relieved to see that he is all right and keeps quiet. Jem remains moody for a week, but Scout does not bother him.

Jem stayed moody and silent for a week. As Atticus had once advised me to do, I tried to climb into Jem's skin and walk around in it: if I had gone alone to the Radley Place at two in the morning, my funeral would have been held the next afternoon. So I left Jem alone and tried not to bother him. (Ch.7)

In Chapter 9 Scout clenches her fists and is "ready to let fly" at Cecil Jacobs because he has accused her father of defending n****rs. This accusation makes her forget that Atticus has promised to "wear out" Scout if she fights anymore.

I drew a bead on him, remembered what Atticus had said, then dropped my fists and walked away... It was the first time I ever walked away from a fight. (Ch.9)

Although Scout falls into her old ways soon after this incident, she realizes her failure in obeying Atticus. After her cousin named Francis insults Atticus, Scout cannot control herself enough to not strike him in the mouth. But, she does demonstrate a certain maturity in trying to keep her father from more anxiety about the Tom Robinson case. For as her Uncle Jack tends to her torn knuckles, she asks him to promise not to tell her father about her fight over Atticus. "I'd ruther him think we were fightin' about somethin' else instead. Please promise...." (Ch.9)

Harper Lee's To Kill A Mockingbird: Scout's Childhood Innocence And Growing Maturity

One’s childhood innocence is never lost, it simply plants the seed for the flower of maturity to bloom. It seems that almost every adult chooses to either forget or ignore this childhood vulnerability. But ironically, it was this quality that pushed them into adulthood in the first place. At the peak of their childhood, their post climactic innocence allows room for the foundation of maturity to begin to grow. In the sleepy southern town of Maycomb this is exactly what happens to eight years old Jean Louise “Scout” Finch. In To Kill a Mockingbird the character Scout is forced to surround herself with a very adult situation, when a trial comes to the small town of Maycomb. The trial raises the question that shakes the entire town up, what prevails, racism, or the truth? And over the course of the novel the author shows how such events affect the way Scout grows over the course of the story. In the timeless novel To Kill a Mockingbird Harper Lee uses Scout’s incentives of purity and the quest for parental approval to stress the novel’s central thesis, the process of growing up.
Scout’s innocence and naivety push her to act the way she does, and also allow her to begin her own journey down the path to adulthood. Her immaturity becomes exceptionally clear in the middle of a neighborhood crisis. When her neighbor’s house catches on fire all Scout is worried about is retrieving a book because she is scared that her friend, Dill, will get mad if it burns in the fire. When she hears that her house might burn down her only words are, “That Tom Swift book, it ain’t mine, it’s Dill’s” (Lee 93). This quote shows her juvenility because when her whole house is threatened by a perilous fire she only says that she has to get Dill’s book. Such actions show that Scout obviously does not realize the severity of the situation. This enhances the novel’s theme because it means that her cluelessness is at its peak. Therefore the author implies that Scout can only grow from this point. This also allows Scout to move with the plot, because the fire is the turning point of the novel. It separates the childish games of Scout, Jem, and Dill, and their Boo Radley phase from the very adult world of racism and the Tom Robinson trial. By showing Scout at her climax, and connecting it to the turning point of the novel, Lee can show the reader a more noticeable change in her character. She also stresses Scout’s moments of bluntness, because it is the contrast between her mature and immature instances that make her mature moments more notable. For example, when Scout sees Boo Radley for the first time, she shows maturity beyond her years. The ordeal was explained by Scout as, “Our neighbor’s image blurred with my sudden tears. ‘Hey Boo’ I said” (Lee 362). The way Scout first reacts by saying hi so calmly shows her maturity. She handles the situation so profoundly by instantly treating him like an equal, something that is difficult even for the adults in Maycomb. This helps out...

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