Underfull Hbox Badness 10000 In Paragraph Bibliography Apa

The l2h help pages © Leon van Dommelen 
The latest version of this document is online at eng.famu.fsu.edu or at dommelen.net.

Warnings while processing LaTeX files

Preface

This web page tries to give some help with warning messages that may pop up while processing your LaTeX file index.tex.

Warning messages are problems that are not severe enough to prevent processing. And a few of them, like "underfull" boxes, are often ignored. But you do want to fix up the rest before making a pdf or web pages of your document.

If you have any warnings that would be good to include here, please e-mail them to me. You will be helping other LaTeX users, even those that do not use l2h. If you can paste them directly from the log file, (so that the log file reader can recognize them), it would be even better. And so it would if you can give a solution to the problem.

Contents





General notes on warnings

Warning messages are problems that are not severe enough to prevent processing. And a few of them, like "underfull" boxes, are often ignored. But you do want to fix up the rest before making a pdf or web pages of your document.

One important thing to remember about warnings: they may be spurious. They often complain about the previous version of your document. In particular, if you correct the reason for a warning, you need to run LaTeX twice to get the warning message to disappear. (The l2h shell will try to do that for you.)

And after you have inserted an additional bibliographical reference you must run LaTeX, then bibtex, then LaTeX two more times for the warning about the missing citation disappears. (Again l2h will do it for you.)

So, if you think you have fixed the problem, run latex a few times to see whether it did. Besides that major annoyance, warnings are usually easy to fix.


A space is missing. (No warning).

Latex ignores spaces behind commands. If you cleverly define a shorthand command for your place of work like \newcommand{\fsu}{The Florida state University}, then "\fsu is well known" shows up as "The Florida state Universityis well known". To avoid this, use "{\fsu} is well known" or "\fsu{} is well known" or "\fsu\ is well known"


Too much space after a point. (No warning).

"Dr. Smith" will print out as "Dr.  Smith", with too much space behind the point. To avoid that, use "Dr.\ Smith". See also the next entry.


Bad line break. (No warning).

Sometimes LaTeX will break the line at a bad point, like between "Dr." and "Smith"

  1. If you type it as "Dr.~Smith", the line will not be broken between the two words.
  2. Inserting a \nolinebreak command will normally prevent a line break. And \linebreak or \newline will create one.

Bad page break. (No warning).

Sometimes LaTeX will start a new page at a bad point.

  1. Inserting a \nopagebreak command will normally prevent a page break. If you are lucky. And \pagebreak or \newpage will create one.

* Font `...' does not contain script '...'.

The font specified in \newfontfamily does not have the hoped for script info and might be wrong.

  1. See first whether the characters show up OK anyway.
  2. Try specifying another font.
  3. Try installing a suitable font. See internationalization.html.

LaTeX Font Warning: Command ... invalid in math mode on input line nnn.

A command is not valid in mathematics mode.

  1. Is the command the one you think it is?
  2. Try putting the command inside an \mbox{} or \hbox{}

LaTeX Font Warning: Some font shapes were not available, defaults substituted.

Look for more specific warnings and check the final document whether the results are unacceptable.


LaTeX Warning: Citation `KEY' on page nnn undefined on input line nnn.

A \cite{KEY} citation refers to a bibliographical reference, (like a paper, book, or report), that has not been defined. Or actually, the citation may already be correctly defined, but LaTeX may not yet know that.

  1. If latex complains about some \cite{KEY} command, check with a text editor that there is some entry in file references.bib that has KEY as label. When that is OK and file references.bib has been saved, first run latex on index.tex, then run bibtex, and then run latex two more times. The warning should disappear.
  2. If not, check for typos in 'KEY'. And that the brackets in the KEY entry in references.bib are properly matched. And that references.bib is properly loaded in a \bibliography{references} command near the end of index.tex. Note that a citation is actually defined by a \bibitem command inside the index.bbl file. So, if all fails, check there.

LaTeX Warning: Command ... invalid in math mode on input line nnn.

A command is not valid in mathematics mode.

  1. Is the command the one you think it is?
  2. Try putting the command inside an \mbox{} or \hbox{}

LaTeX Warning: Float too large for page by nn.nnnpt on input line nnn.

Your picture or table is too big vertically. (Note that a pt is about the size of a point: 72 pt = 1 inch.)

  1. For a table, split it into two tables.
  2. For a figure, try using something like \resizebox{!}{500pt}{CONTENTS OF PICTURE}
  3. Or split it into two figures. If necessary, use an \addtocounter{figure}{-1} or \addtocounter{table}{-1} to keep the figure or table number from increasing.

LaTeX Warning: `h' float specifier changed to `ht'.

If you put [h] behind a \begin{figure}, you are telling LaTeX to put the picture right [h]ere at this point in the text. However, LaTeX thinks you are an idiot. If LaTeX, in its wisdom, finds the figure just slightly awkward at the given point, (maybe not enough lines above or below it), it puts the figure elsewhere, normally at the top of some later page. So it adds a [t]op allowed position, changing your stupid [h] into a much better [ht]. (And then ignores your h.)

  1. If you want it HERE, make sure the float package is loaded using \usepackage and then change [h] into [H].

LaTeX Warning: Label `LABEL' multiply defined.

You have two \label{LABEL} commands with the same label LABEL. Or two bibliographical references inside references.bib with the same KEY. For me, a multiple label is usually a result of too much cut and paste. A multiple KEY is usually a second paper by the same author in the same year.

  1. Change one LABEL into LABEL2 and run latex a couple of times. The error should disappear. Unless there is a third instance.
  2. Or change one KEY into KEYb.

LaTeX Warning: Label(s) may have changed. Rerun to get cross-references right.

Like it says. This will fix the numbers produced \ref, \pageref, and \cite commands.

  1. Run latex again on index.tex.

LaTeX Warning: Marginpar on page nnn moved.

A note in the margin intruded on another one and was moved. It is no longer aligned with the text it is commenting on.

  1. Do you really need both notes in the margin?
  2. Can they be made more concise?
  3. Make the margins bigger?

LaTeX Warning: No ... typeface in this size, using ...

A type style declaration specified a font that is not available. Another font was substituted.

  1. See whether the substitution is acceptable. Otherwise try something else.
  2. If you are looking for bold math or something like it, have a look at the AMS fonts.

LaTeX Warning: Oval too small.

An \oval command in a picture specified an oval that is smaller than latex can make it. See the next entry.


LaTeX Warning: \oval, \circle, or \line size unavailable on input line nnn.

An \oval, \circle, or \line command in a picture has a size that LaTeX cannot produce. It is somewhat of a pain that LaTeX cannot make oblique lines smaller than about the size of a letter. And it cannot make big circles either.

  1. Latex can make horizontal and vertical lines of any size.
  2. Use a drawing program like xfig that can produce eps output to draw what you want. Then include the produced eps figure in your picture using \epsffile.
  3. Less desirable, use a bitmap drawing program like MicroSoft Paint or xpaint to draw what you want. Then convert the produced bmp file into eps. One way to convert the file to eps is to look in the convert subfolder of l2h and find the folder named graphics. If you put your picture in that folder and double-click bmp_to_eps, an eps version will be created. If you do this, make the picture big and resize it with a \resizebox command. Or quality will be miserable.

LaTeX Warning: Reference `LABEL' on page nnn undefined on input line nnn.

A \ref{LABEL} refers to a label, (like that of an equation, figure, table, section, ...), that has not been defined. Or actually, the label may already be correctly defined, but LaTeX may not yet know that. (Note that this is not a bibliographical reference; a bibliographical reference is referred to as a "citation".)

  1. If latex complains about some \ref{LABEL} command, check that there is a corresponding \label{LABEL} command inside the referred-to equation or table (behind the caption command), or equation, or immediately behind the \chapter / \section / ... command. When that is OK, run latex on index.tex one or two times. The warning should disappear.

LaTeX Warning: There were multiply-defined labels.

Find and fix the corresponding specific warning(s)


LaTeX Warning: There were undefined references.

Find and fix the corresponding specific warning(s)


LaTeX Warning: You have requested release `...' of LaTeX,

Your LaTeX is too old for some package.

  1. If there is a problem in the final document, upgrade.

LaTeX Warning: You have requested, on input line ..., version

One of your packages is older than another package wants. This warning is often ignorable, in my experience.

  1. If the package is in the "texinputs" folder of l2h, try taking it temporarily out of there. Then latex may be able to find a more recent version elsewhere. (This should certainly work for MiKTeX, for one.)
  2. Try finding a more recent version on the web. Put it in texinputs. Note that you may have to run latex on any .ins or .dtx file you find to get the sty file.

LaTeX Warning: ... in math mode.

You are using something inside math mode that is not legal.

  1. If you need it, put it inside an \mbox{}. Math mode is suspended inside the brackets of an \mbox{} (or a \hbox{}, for that matter.)

Missing character: There is no ... in font ...

A selected font does not have the required character.

  1. Try to use another character?
  2. Select another font with \newfontfamily when using xelatex?
  3. Install such a font first?

Overfull \hbox (nn.nnnpt too wide) detected at line nnn

A line is too long and sticks out in the right margin. (Note that a pt is about the size of a point: 72 pt = 1 inch.)

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file.
  2. If this is an equation, you may have to split it up in two equations. Or you can break the single equation into several lines by turning the equation environment into an eqnarray one. If this is an displaymath environment rather than an equation one, turn it into an eqnarray* environment.

Overfull \hbox (nn.nnnpt too wide) has occurred while \output is active

A line is too long and sticks out in the right margin. (Note that a pt is about the size of a point: 72 pt = 1 inch.)

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file.
  2. Have a look at the previous and next items.

Overfull \hbox (nn.nnnpt too wide) in paragraph at lines nnn--nnn

To produce the final document, LaTeX must break up the paragraphs that you write in lines of the right size. However, while trying to do so in a reasonable way, it ended up with a line with too much text on it. It is sticking out into the right margin. (Note that a pt is about the size of a point: 72 pt = 1 inch.) LaTeX also lists the relevant text, using hyphens to show you where it is willing to hyphenate words.

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file. You will see the line sticking out.
  2. Put in "\-" discretionary hyphens. For example, LaTeX will not normally hyphenate already hyphenated words like "three-dimensional". But if such a long word ends up near the end of a line, there is very likely to be an underfull or overfull line. In that case, writing it as "three-di\-men\-sional" allows LaTeX to break the word either as "three-di-" and "mensional", or as "three-dimen-" and "sional". That usually solves the problem.
  3. In some cases I simply rewrite the paragraph slightly. Interestingly enough, I often find that the new paragraph is better than the original one.
  4. Enclose the entire paragraph inside \begin{sloppypar} and \end{sloppypar}. Somehow, personally I never do this at all. I do not like sloppy documents.
  5. Break a line yourself with a \linebreak command. Do this only when you are finalizing the document. Like the previous item, this may produce an "underfull \hbox" warning. (Which means too much space between the individual words.)
  6. Break a line yourself with a \newline command. Do this only when you are finalizing the document. This will leave a line that is shorter than normal.

Overfull \vbox (nn.nnnpt too high) detected at line nnn

LaTeX made a page longer than it wanted. (Note that a pt is about the size of a point: 72 pt = 1 inch.)

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file to see how bad it is.
  2. If a figure or table is too long vertically, you will need to break it up into two figures or tables.
  3. If the amount that the table or figure is too long is very small, a \resizebox using the graphicx package may be a quick fix.

Overfull \vbox (nn.nnnpt too high) has occurred while \output is active

A page in the final document can be only so long. So when LaTeX creates the final document, it needs to choose points at which to start the next page. In trying to do so in a reasonable manner, LaTeX ended up with a page with too much text on it. So LateX probably really squeezed the space between paragraphs and lines. And the page is still too long. (Note that a pt is about the size of a point: 72 pt = 1 inch.)

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file to see how bad it is.
  2. One possible solution is to rewrite the paragraph(s) involved a bit.
  3. Break a page yourself with a \pagebreak command. Do this only when you are finalizing the document. This may produce an "underfull \vbox" warning. (Which means too much space between the paragraphs and lines.)
  4. Break a line yourself with a \newline command. Do this only when you are finalizing the document. This will leave a shorter page than normal.

Package etoolbox Warning: Patching '\begin' failed!

This error shows up because l2h maintains the highest standards of code integrity. Patching up things is a nono. The mere loss of \AtBeginEnvironment is a small price to pay if the very difference between shell writers and package writers is at stake.

Also, I have no clue what \AtBeginEnvironment is supposed to do.


Package hyperref Warning: Token not allowed in a PDF string (PDFDocEncoding):

In general, math mode symbols, like for example \sigma, are not available for inclusion in PDF bookmarks, etc.

  1. One approach is to use \texorpdfstring:
    \title{Some text \texorpdfstring{$\sigma$}{[sigma]}}
    which will use $\sigma$ in TeX and [sigma] for the bookmark.
  2. On the other hand, if you are using sigma for something non-mathematical, then consider using a UTF-8 engine (XeTeX or LuaTeX) and inserting the character directly.
(Thanks to Joseph Wright at tex.stackexchange.com)
Package hyperref Warning: Rerun to get /PageLabels entry.
  1. Rerun LaTeX.

Package natbib Warning: Citation `KEY' on page nnn undefined on input line nnn.

A \cite{KEY} (or \citet or \citep) citation refers to a bibliographical reference, (like a paper, book, or report), that has not been defined. Or actually, the citation may already be correctly defined, but LaTeX may not yet know that.

  1. If LaTeX complains about some \cite.{KEY} command, check with a text editor that there is some entry in file references.bib that has KEY as label. When that is OK and file references.bib has been saved, first run latex on index.tex, then bibtex, and then run latex two more times. (The l2h shell tries to do this automatically.) The warning should disappear.
  2. If not, check for typos in 'KEY'. And that the brackets in the KEY entry in references.bib are properly matched. And that references.bib is properly loaded in a \bibliography{references} command near the end of index.tex.

Package natbib Warning: There were undefined citations.

Find and fix the specific warning(s) as described above.


Package polyglossia Warning: No hyphenation patterns were loaded for `...'

You are probably missing the setup of the language in your LaTeX installation.

  1. Apparently, MikTeX has a language tab to deal with this.
  2. In Debian/Ubuntu, you would need to install some package like texlive-lang-...

Package rerunfilecheck Warning: File `...' has changed.

Latex must be rerun because the hyperref labels have changed.


pdfTeX warning (ext4): destination with the same identifier (...) has been already used, duplicate ignored

Someone has been messing around with the page numbers. (One day I need to fix this in the thesis templates.)

  1. Apparently hyperref options "plainpages=false,pdfpagelabels" might help.

Underful \hbox (badness nnn) detected at line nnn

There is a line with too little text on it. LaTeX did not know how to stretch it to the right margin. For example "\hbox to 4in {Hello.}" will produce this message. The word Hello is far too small to extend to 4 inches.

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file.
  2. Maybe not use "\hbox to 4in {Hello.}"? What you want is probably better done with LaTeX commands like \makebox or \parbox.

Underfull \hbox (badness nnn) has occurred while \output is active

There is a line with too little text on it. LaTeX did not know how to stretch it to the right margin.

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file.
  2. Have a look at the previous and next items.

Underfull \hbox (badness nnn) in paragraph at lines nnn--nnn

To produce the final document, LaTeX must break up the paragraphs that you write in lines of the right size. However, while trying to do so in a reasonable way, it ended up with a line with too little text on it.

  1. Look at the produced pdf. You will probably see a line with too much space between the words, as LaTeX stretched it to reach the right margin.
  2. You can add a possible hyphenation point in a strategic place. For example, LaTeX will not normally hyphenate already hyphenated words like "three-dimensional". But if such a long word ends up near the end of a line, there is very likely to be an underfull or overfull line. In that case, writing it as "three-di\-men\-sional" allows LaTeX to break the word either as "three-di-" and "mensional", or as "three-dimen-" and "sional". That usually solves the problem.
  3. In some cases I simply rewrite the paragraph slightly. Interestingly enough, I often find that the new paragraph is better than the original one.
  4. If you used a \linebreak command to break a line somewhere, consider a \newline or \\ instead. At a \newline or \\, LaTeX does not try to stretch the line to the right margin.

Underfull \vbox (badness nnn) detected at line nnn

LaTeX made a page with less text on it than it wanted. It cannot stretch it vertically enough to make a full page. For example, a \pagebreak can cause this warning.

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file to see how bad it is.
  2. If you are fine with having a short page, use \newpage instead. Then LaTeX will not try to make a full length page.

Underfull \vbox (badness nnn) has occurred while \output is active

A page in the final document can be only so long. So when LaTeX creates the final document, it needs to choose points at which to start the next page. In trying to do so in a reasonable manner, LaTeX ended up with a page with less text on it than it should have. So LateX probably put lots of space between paragraphs.

  1. Have a look at the output produced in the pdf file to see how bad it is.
  2. This is usually not something that you would want to spend much time on until you are finalizing the document. At that time, have a look at the entry on the overfull \vbox case. (Frankly, personally I routinely simply ignore underfull vboxes like this. I guess I should not really.)
Created: 8th December 2012M / 24 Muharam 1434H, Sa.
Published: 17th February 2013M / 6 Rabiulakhir 1434H, Su.
Updated:


Assalamualaikum warahmatullah. Inspired by this statement:
... I would never accept a final PDF where there's some Overfull \hbox.

Source: Do I have to care about bad boxes?
In answer by egreg
http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/50838
... I decided to solve all the warnings and badboxes in my thesis although there is no problem at all to produce a PDF output (PDFLaTeX).

Starting with about 0 errors, 31 warnings, 212 badboxes (see Pic 1), I've managed to trim them down to 0 errors, 0 warnings, 3 badboxes (see Pic 2). The remaining badboxes are in the generated bibliography which I don't know how to solve.

Pic 1 - Starting with 0 errors, 31 warnings, 212 badboxes.



Pic 2 - Ending with 0 errors, 0 warnings, 3 badboxes.



Badboxes, according to egreg:
1. Overfull \hbox messages tell you that some line sticks out over the right margin;

2. Underfull \hbox messages tell you that some line is poorly typeset (or that you've improperly used \\ to leave a vertical space (for example, typing two \\ in a row);

3. Underfull \vbox messages usually tell you that a page is poorly typeset.

Source: Do I have to care about bad boxes?
In answer by egreg
http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/50838


Read the answers here to know a little bit more about the badboxes:
What are underfull hboxes and vboxes and how can I get rid of them?
http://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/138/what-are-underfull-hboxes-and-vboxes-and-how-can-i-get-rid-of-them


About the badness number:
Similar are \hbadness and vbadness which are a measure of how bad a box is, typically how much white space has had to be stretched. the exact number is not usually that relevant but 0 is good and 10000 is infinitely bad (TeX's badness calculation arbitrarily forces any very bad boxes to this amount).

Source: Do I have to care about bad boxes?
In answer by David Carlisle
http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/50850

My suggestion is to solve the warnings as much as possible first, and then solve the badboxes.



Part A: The draft

As suggested by Otis:
If you use draft mode (\documentclass[draft]{article}) you can see black lines on the side of your document where there is overfull hbox badness. This is a convenient way to find and fix these errors. – Otis Jul 26 '10 at 19:54

Source: What does “overfull hbox” mean?
In comment by Otis
http://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/35/what-does-overfull-hbox-mean#comment21_39


1. In the preamble, add the term (see Pic 3):
draft
...in the \documentclass.

Pic 3 - Refer to Step 1. Creating the draft.



2. Compile the document by Build > Compile > PDFLaTeX for the first compile. See Pic 4.

The following compiles can use the Build > QuickBuild. See Pic 5.

Pic 4 - Refer to Step 2. Compiling the PDF output.



Pic 5 - Refer to Step 2.



Don't worry when the figures in the output document are substituted with a thin black-bordered hollow rectangle, see Pic 6. Compare Pic 6 with Pic 7.

If you seem to get errors when previously there weren't any errors, try running this step (QuickBuild compile) a few times. Try about 3 to 4 times or more until you get about the same amount of warnings and badboxes as you had before changing the document into a draft.

Pic 6 - Refer to Step 2. The draft as viewed in Okular.



Pic 7 - Refer to Step 2. The original/finished document as viewed in Okular.



3. Make the necessary corrections to solve the warnings and badboxes. Refer to Part B to Part G in this post.


4. As this "drafting" step is temporary, the draft term added in Step 1 should be removed after the required corrections are completed in order to return to the 'print'/'real' mode.



Part B: "Shell escape feature is not enabled."

One of the warnings that might arise in Kile from Step 2 is the "Shell escape feature is not enabled." warning. See Pic 8.

Pic 8 - "Shell escape feature is not enabled." warning.



By solving the shell escape warning, this deducted 1 warning for me. See Pic 9.

Pic 9 - Progressing with 0 errors, 30 warnings, 212 badboxes.



See also:
Development of LaTeX frontend kile. () > eps && pdf
http://comments.gmane.org/gmane.comp.kde.devel.kile/1410


5. Go to Settings > Configure Kile... . See Pic 10.

Pic 10 - Refer to Step 5. Accessing the Configure - Kile dialog.



6. In the Configure - Kile dialog, see Pic 11,
in the leftmost column, go to Tools > Build.

Then under the Select a tool column, select PDFLaTeX.

Go to the General tab. In the Options: field, change from this:
-interaction=nonstopmode '%source'

... to this:
-interaction=nonstopmode -shell-escape '%source'

Source: Forward & Reverse DVI with multiple file document
In reply by dj_bridges
http://www.latex-community.org/viewtopic.php?f=20&t=3380#p13225

Then click the OK button.

Pic 11 - Refer to Step 6. Enabling the shell escape option.



7. Compile the document. Refer to Step 2.



Part C:`!h' float specifier changed to `!ht'.

Fixing the "`!h' float specifier changed to `!ht'." warning (see Pic 12) should reduce the number of warnings.

Pic 12 - The "`!h' float specifier changed to `!ht'." warning.



The float specifiers:
h means here allowed,
t means top,
b means bottom,
p means on a float-page,
! means try harder! to place it earlier.

Source: `h' float specifier changed to `ht' warning when not attempting to specify a float
In answer by Stefan Kottwitz
http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/1527

Usually h is too strict. This way you don't allow top, bottom or page placement. Use at least ht instead, or relax it to htbp or even !htbp if you like. If you really need it to be exactly "here", use the H option together with the float package. There are further ways. But adding placement options is usually fine.

Source: LaTeX Warning About Height, \hbox, and \vbox, and ht
In answer by Stefan Kottwitz
http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/6983

Read more about floats, here:
LaTeX/Floats, Figures and Captions > Floats
http://en.wikibooks.org/wiki/LaTeX/Floats,_Figures_and_Captions#Floats


8. Check the float specifiers in the *.tex files.

Change from [!h] or [h!]
to [!ht] or [!hb] or any specifier combination you want depending on your needs. See Pic 13 and Pic 15.

Pic 13 - Refer to Step 8. Float specifier for a figure in my thesis.



9. Compile the document. Refer to Step 2.

My suggestion is: change the float specifier for one figure or table at a time then compile. If the number of warning goes down, only then proceed to the next figure or table.



Part D:"No positions in optional float specifier."

Fixing the "No positions in optional float specifier." warning (see Pic 14) should reduce the number of warnings.

Pic 14 - The "No positions in optional float specifier." warning.



I use sidewaysfigure and sidewaystable. Previously i didn't use the float specifier for the sideways because if I used an unsuitable specifier, LaTeX will lump all the figures at the end of the chapter instead of placing them where I have placed them throughout the chapter.

If you put in a suitable specifier, the warning goes away and the object (figure/ table) stays where you want it to be.


10. For the sidewaysfigure or sidewaystable, instead of using [!h] or [!ht], I used [!p]. See Pic 15.

Pic 15 - Refer to Step 10. The float specifier for a sidewaysfigure in my thesis.



11. Compile the document. Refer to Step 2.

My suggestion is: change the float specifier for one figure or table at a time then compile. If the number of warning goes down, only then proceed to the next figure or table.

The draft for Pic 15 is shown in Pic 16, and the "real" page is shown in Pic 17.

Pic 16 - Refer to Step 11. The sidewaysfigure in draft mode.



Pic 17 - Refer to Step 11. The sidewaysfigure in print mode.




Part E: "Font shape `OT1/cmr/bx/sc' undefined(Font) using `OT1/cmr/bx/n' instead on input line ##."

Fixing the "Font shape `OT1/cmr/bx/sc' undefined(Font) using `OT1/cmr/bx/n' instead on input line ##." warning (see Pic 18) should reduce the number of warnings.

Pic 18 - The "Font shape `OT1/cmr/bx/sc' undefined(Font) using `OT1/cmr/bx/n' instead on input line 6." warning.



About the warning:
You did nothing wrong. TeX tells you that it does not have Small Caps bold Computer Modern font, so it switches to bold normal font. This is a design decision by font author (Knuth) not to have this variant; you may try to find fonts that have bold small caps (not that I know of such) or to fake the effect using uppercase.

Actually your line is already in uppercase, so I wonder whether you really need small caps: usually people use small caps with lowercase letters, with \textsc{\MakeLowercase{...}}

Source: A problem with \textsc
In answer by Boris
http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/37620


12. There are 2 solutions I can think of, attemped, and worked for me:

A. The solution I used in my thesis is to remove the Small Caps code, \textsc and simply type in all capitals. See Pic 19.


B. Another way is as Boris mentioned. The code is shown in Pic 19 and the output is shown in Pic 20.

Pic 19 - Refer to Step 12. The Small Caps code. All caps (above) and Small Caps (below).



Pic 20 - Refer to Step 12. The output for Pic 19 at 150% zoom in Okular. All caps (above) and Small Caps (below).



13. Compile the document. Refer to Step 2.



Part F: "Overfull \hbox (##pt too wide) in paragraph"

Fixing the "Overfull \hbox (##pt too wide) in paragraph" badbox (see Pic 21) should reduce the number of badboxes.

Pic 21 - The "Overfull \hbox (##pt too wide) in paragraph" badbox.



About fixing the Overfull \hbox:
but what can be done about Overfull \hbox? – alfC Apr 5 at 18:10
http://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/50830/do-i-have-to-care-about-bad-boxes#comment105354_50838

@alfC Some small text editing usually solves the problem. I use to say that very rarely the first or even the fourth version of a text has so polished a prose that it's become untouchable. :) – egreg Apr 5 at 19:40
http://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/50830/do-i-have-to-care-about-bad-boxes#comment105386_50838

small text editing means changing the choice of words? (just asking). – alfC Apr 6 at 7:08
http://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/50830/do-i-have-to-care-about-bad-boxes#comment105496_50838

@alfC That's one of the possibilities. In some case just altering the word order can help; adding or removing a "that"; applying a hyphenation that TeX wouldn't have chosen; … – egreg Apr 6 at 8:58
http://tex.stackexchange.com/questions/50830/do-i-have-to-care-about-bad-boxes#comment105507_50838

Source: Do I have to care about bad boxes?
In comments to egreg's answer
http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/50838


14. Scroll in the drafted output (refer to Part A) to look for a thick black vertical (with respect to the text direction) line. These thick lines mark the items that exceed the right-hand margin.

See Pic 22 for an example of an overfull figure,
Pic 23 for an overfull sidewaysfigure,
Pic 24 for an overfull table, and
Pic 25 for an overfull text.

Pic 22 - Refer to Step 14. Example of an overfull figure.



Pic 23 - Refer to Step 14. Example of an overfull sidewaysfigure.



Pic 24 - Refer to Step 14. Example of an overfull table.



Pic 25 - Refer to Step 14. Example of an overfull text.



15. When you see the thick line, go the related *.tex file.

Note that these are only suggestions of what-to-do to overcome the badboxes. Adjust accordingly to suit your needs.

A. If it's a figure, scale-down the figure.


B. If it's a table, adjust the cell size, or font size, or wording.


C. If it's texts, adjust the horizontal space for the text, or change the wording, or add hyphenation.


16. Compile the document. Refer to Step 2.



Part G: Fixing the Underfull \hbox badboxes

This fix was inspired by this post:
You should rarely need to use \\ in documents apart from its use in alignments (where it is a macro based on the \cr primitive), and you should rarely need \par in documents as a blank line should suffice.

Source: When to use \par and when \\
In reply by David Carlisle
http://tex.stackexchange.com/a/82666


The usual mistakes:
The usual mistake is *ending* a paragraph with \\

As I did just above -- with a blank line or \par following after \\. People do this to increase the paragraph separation, when they should instead set \parskip.  The underfull box arises because the paragraph-fill space (\parfillskip) is discarded when a totally empty line occurs.

If you *begin* a paragraph with \\ (\\ after a blank line) LaTeX complains explicitly.

Source: Underfull \hbox (badness 10000) warning
In reply by Donald Arseneau
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/comp.text.tex/5LZ06meo80s/sm3UwYPAYGYJ


About the \\ (double backslash):
The intent of \\ is to fill with whitespace and produce a linebreak. Maybe you are thinking of \linebreak rather than \\ (or \newline).

Source: Underfull \hbox (badness 10000) warning
In reply by Donald Arseneau
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/comp.text.tex/5LZ06meo80s/sm3UwYPAYGYJ


Initially I used \\ at the end of paragraphs like in Pic 26.

Then I used \vspace and \par at the beginning of paragraphs like in Pic 27.

In the end I used \vspace and blank lines. I didn't use \setlength{\parskip} because it upsets the spacing-between-paragraphs of the whole document whereas I want it to effect only the chapters; fine-writing the template might be able to make it work as needed. So to obtain the spacing-between-paragraphs, I used \vspace{8.0 mm}. The extra blank lines are for my own readability.

Pic 26 - Using \\ at the end of a paragraph.



Pic 27 - Using \vspace{8.0 mm} \par at the beginning of a paragraph.



17. In the *.tex file, I deleted all \\ and \par and rearranged \vspace{8.0 mm} to be above paragraphs. See Pic 28.

Note that I use \\ in a list or any text that has no blank lines in between. See Pic 29.

Pic 28 - Refer to Step 17. Using \vspace{8.0 mm} and blank lines.
The "Naturals fibers" paragraph is on a new page after a sidewaysfigure, thus explains the absent \vspace{8.0 mm} above the paragraph.



Pic 29 - Refer to Step 17. Using \\ in a list.



18. Compile the document. Refer to Step 2.

The output of Pic 28 is shown in Pic 30

Pic 30 - Refer to Step 18. The output of the paragraph at 100% zoom in Okular.




Alhamdulillah. Wassalam.

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