A2 Level English Literature Courseworks

Summary

This course is based on the study of 4 main areas of English Literature: Shakespeare, contemporary drama, poetry and the novel. You will develop an understanding of how writers create a piece of literature and the importance of the context in which it is written and read. In some areas you will be invited to consider a wide range of interpretations to literary texts.

Students' perspectives: ‘I studied A Levels in English Literature, Film Studies and Media and got three grades A! I am going to study BA (Hons) Journalism at Liverpool John Moores University. I want to thank all my tutors at Bournville for their support and pushing me to achieve more than I ever expected.’

Description

To obtain a certificate for Advanced Subsidiary GCE, you will need to have studied for and been assessed in 2 AS units.

To obtain a certificate for Advanced GCE, you will need to have studied for and been assessed on your performance in 4 A Level units including content studied in the AS year.

Teaching methods are based around group discussion and lecture centred learning. Coursework sessions are frequently run in workshop style, which enables you to gain the best possible grade for each piece of written work. In addition, students have the opportunity to go on a number of theatre trips. AS and A Level groups regularly go to see productions at the RSC in Stratford Upon Avon and The Lowry Centre in Manchester. The College also has strong links with the English department at Aston University and the students have bi-annual attendance at undergraduate lecturers by the professors in residence.

Work experience is a compulsory part of the course and helps you develop the skills required to progress to university and the world of work.

Key Areas

The components available at AS are: Component 1: Poetry and Drama (2 hour examination, open book, 60% of the qualification) This module is designed to introduce you to the discipline of literary studies. You will be exploring a range of contemporary poems published in the Poems of the Decade anthology and drawing comparisons between poems. In addition, you will be exploring the presentation of social themes in Tennessee Williams’ play A Streetcar Named Desire. You will study the form, structure and language of these texts and also the context in which they are written.

Component 2: Prose (1 hour examination, open book, 40% of the qualification) You will develop your responses Mary Shelley’s ground-breaking gothic novel Frankenstein and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go, shortlisted for the 2005 Man Booker Prize. The focus of your analysis of these texts will explore the relationship between science and society, including issues relating morality, religion, knowledge, identity and individualism.

The components available at A Level are: Component 1: Drama (2 hour and 15 minute examination, open book, 30% of the qualification) Learners explore two tragedies; one pre-1800 and one post-1800. You will be considering multiple critical interpretations of William Shakespeare’s Othello; approaching the play with feminist, post-colonial, Marxist and new historicist readings. In addition, the AS content for A Streetcar Named Desire will be reassessed in Section B of the exam.

Component 2: Prose (1 hour examination, open book, 20% of the qualification) Comparisons between Mary Shelley’s novel Frankenstein and Kazuo Ishiguro’s Never Let Me Go are revised and reassessed from the AS year.

Component 3: Poetry (2 hour and 15 minute examination, open book, 30% of the qualification) The Poems of the Decade anthology is revised from the AS year, but this time compared with unseen poems. Learners will develop their understanding and appreciation of how structure, form and language shape meanings in seen and unseen contemporary poems. In addition, learners will explore a collection of poetry by the metaphysical poet John Donne and analyse how his poems articulate complex anxieties surrounding religion, identity and love.

Component 4: Coursework (3000 word essay, 20% of the qualification) You will focus on the comparison between two prose texts. One text will be set by your tutor and you will have some choice over the other literary text with a clear intertextual link. Assessment will be by production of a coursework folder containing a well researched 3000 word academic essay.

Entry Criteria

5 GCSEs at grade 5 (C) or above, including at least a grade 5 (C) in English language and preferably grade 6.

What Next

Students will gain an AS in English Literature at the end of the first year of study. Students will then have the opportunity to enter a second year of study to gain an A-level qualification. Progression into the second year of study, however, is dependent on them gaining a minimum of a grade D in the AS component of the course.

With a qualification in English Literature, you could go into higher education and/or work in the media and communication industry, teaching, administration, publishing or librarianship.


Course options

  • 2018/19 Full Time Day

    Provider

    Bournville College Birmingham

    Location

    Bournville Campus


    Mode of attendance

    2018/19 Full Time Day

    Days

    Please contact the college for days of the week

    Age rangeStartFeesDurationFurther information
    16-18September | 2018/19-2 Academic Year(s) Any course under level 4 for 16-18 year olds is likely to be free.
    19-23 (no level 3 qualification)September | 2018/19-2 Academic Year(s) Any course under level 4 for 19-23 year olds without a full level 3 qualification is likely to be free, please contact the college for further information
    19-23 (with 1 or more level 3 qualifications)September | 2018/19£1,8002 Academic Year(s) You are eligible for an advanced learning loan; please visit our advanced learning loan information page to find out more.
    24+September | 2018/19£1,8002 Academic Year(s) You are eligible for an advanced learning loan; please visit our advanced learning loan information page to find out more.
    Hours Per WeekStudy DetailsMinimum AgeAverage Class SizeMax Class SizeMaterial FeesInternational Fees
    --16--0.005,000.00

    Leisure Program FeesFurther InformationInternational Comments
    0.00 - -

Independent critical study: Texts across time

This resource provides guidance on the NEA requirements for A-level English Literature A, and should be read in conjunction with the NEA requirements set out in the specification. It develops and exemplifies the requirements, but is wholly consistent with them. Exemplar student responses accompany this guidance.

Texts across time is the non-exam assessment (NEA) component of our new A-level English Literature A specification. The specification is committed to the notion of autonomous personal reading and Texts across time provides students with the invaluable opportunity to work independently, follow their own interests and to develop their own ideas and meanings. To that end, few restrictions are placed on the student’s freedom to choose their own texts and shape their own task but the following requirements must be met:

Key reminders

  • Students write a comparative critical study of two texts on a theme of their choice
  • An appropriate academic bibliography must be included
  • An academic form of referencing must be used
  • The word count is 2,500 words (not including quotations or academic bibliography)
  • The task must be worded so that it gives access to all five assessment objectives (AOs)
  • One text must have been written pre-1900
  • Two different authors must be studied
  • Equal attention must be paid to each text
  • A-level core set texts and chosen comparative set texts listed for study in either Love through the ages or in Texts in shared contexts cannot be used for NEA
  • Texts in translation, that have been influential and significant in the development of literature in English, can be used
  • Poetry texts must be as substantial as a novel or a play. A poetry text could be either one longer narrative poem or a single authored collection of shorter poems. A discrete Chaucer Tale would be suitable as a text for study, as would a poem such as The Rape of the Lock. If students are using a collection of short poems, they must have studied the whole text and select at least two poems to write about in detail as examples of the wider collection
  • Single authored collections of short stories are permissible. If students are using a collection of short stories, they must have studied the whole text and select at least two stories to write about in detail as examples of the wider collection.

Managing the NEA

The introduction to NEA should provide students with a detailed review of the above requirements and guidance on what it means to work independently (e.g. productive research skills, effective time management). The point at which students begin their NEA preparation will depend on individual school and college decisions. Schools and colleges may aim to introduce the NEA in the first year of the course. An appropriate opportunity would be the six weeks which follow the completion of AS examinations but other opportunities will be available, especially where schools and colleges are not entering their students for AS.

Approaching the NEA

Schools and colleges will differ in how they approach NEA and this may be dependent upon whether:

  • Students all choose individual texts and tasks for their NEA
  • One text is taught to the whole cohort and the second text is individually chosen
  • AS and A-level students are co-taught and an AS only prose text (The Mill on the Floss/The Rotters’ Club) is studied for NEA with the second text individually chosen.

These approaches are equally valid and take account of the different contexts in which schools and colleges will be working. What is important is that each approach recognises that a degree of autonomy in student text and task choice is required. Ideally a range of differentiated texts and tasks will be seen across a submission for this component. That said, students will choose their texts and shape their tasks with your support (and you will be supported by your NEA advisor) and the following offers you some guidance on how to help your students make these choices.

Advice on text choice

Connecting two texts on a common theme means choosing two texts which maximise opportunities for writing about both similarities and differences. Whilst the only date requirement is that one text must be written pre-1900, the component title 'Texts across time' indicates that effective comparison and contrast occurs when the same theme is explored in two texts separated by a significant period of time; here the different contexts of production will inform the similarities and differences in approach taken by the writers to the chosen theme and students will have encountered this diachronic approach in component 1, Love through the ages. This is particularly pertinent if students choose two texts from the same genre (poetry, prose, drama). If, however, students are interested in writing about a theme within a clearly defined time period, it is advisable to consider how the study of texts from different genres will open up discussion of similarities and differences. Students will encounter this synchronic approach in component 2: Texts in shared contexts, and exemplar student response A is an excellent example of the successful connection of a prose and drama text, written within twenty five years of each other, from the Victorian period.

When supporting students with their choice of texts, therefore, the following guidance is useful:

  • both texts should be of sufficient weight and of suitable ‘quality’ for A-level study; the set text lists for the examined components help to exemplify what is meant by a substantial text, particularly in relation to selecting an appropriate amount of poetry for a poetry ‘text’. Remember, however, that the A-level set texts cannot be used in NEA
  • texts chosen for study must maximise opportunities for writing about both similarities and differences
  • texts must allow access to a range of critical views and interpretations, including over time, which students can evaluate and apply autonomously. Secondary sources, relevant to the texts, can include film and stage productions, books and articles; an example of an appropriate bibliography accompanies the exemplar student responses
  • once texts are identified, which both address the student’s chosen theme, a more defined focus for the essay is needed; this may arise, for example, from similarities and differences in genre (poetry, prose, drama), type (e.g. gothic fiction), contexts (e.g. of production and reception), authorial method (e.g. narrative structure or point of view), theoretical perspective (e.g. feminism). Exemplar student response A is a good example of how the wider theme of the role of women in the nineteenth-century has been more clearly defined in the focus on two specific relationships and the inclusion of a clear viewpoint – that ‘the personal is political’ – for consideration.

If students are struggling to identify a thematic topic area of interest to them, or texts for study, the specification offers suggestions of themes (page 20) and, as at least one of the texts must have been written pre-1900, of pre-1900 texts (pages 21-22). This is by no means an exhaustive list and it should be emphasised that students are free to develop their own interests from their independent reading. The exemplar NEA responses, however, show how these suggestions might be taken as a starting point and then developed with a more clearly defined focus. Other such combinations to consider as a starting point might include:

  • representations of men in Vanity Fair and A Doll’s House
  • the gothic in Northanger Abbey and Keats’ poems (‘Lamia’, 'Isabella or The Pot of Basil’ and ‘The Eve of St Agnes’)
  • representations of social class and culture in Middlemarch and She Stoops to Conquer
  • satire and dystopia in Frankenstein and The School for Scandal
  • representations of women in The Yellow Wallpaper and ‘The Wife of Bath’s Tale’

Clearly the texts mentioned may be interchangeable with other texts suggested in the specification or indeed with the student’s own choice of texts (which may include one post-1900 text); the broad themes will undoubtedly be interchangeable with others and will need to be refined to identify a more clearly defined comparative focus. What these suggestions provide, therefore, is a way for students to begin thinking about the NEA and student autonomy should always be encouraged.

Advice on task choice

We encourage schools and colleges to check individual students’ essay titles with their AQA NEA adviser before students embark on their research, especially where there may be some uncertainty about the appropriateness of texts or the approach being taken.

What is clear, given that the NEA assesses all five assessment objectives (AOs), is that the task must allow access to them all. Students should be familiar with this concept by the time they approach the NEA as all AOs are tested in all questions in the examined components 1 and 2. Exemplar student response A is a good example of how access to all AOs is enabled by the task and the moderator commentary explains how the AOs have been addressed by the student. It is worth considering how key terms in the task wording enable different AOs to be accessed:

Compare and contrast the ways in which Elizabeth Gaskell and Henrik Ibsen present the relationships between Margaret Hale and John Thornton in North and South (1854-55) and Nora and Torvald Helmer in A Doll’s House (1879).

Examine the view that in both texts, ‘the personal is political’.

AO1: Articulate informed, personal and creative responses to literary texts, using associated concepts and terminology, and coherent, accurate written expression.

The use of the command words ‘compare and contrast’ invites the student to organise her response around relevant similarities and differences in the presentation of relationships in the chosen texts. In doing so, she will express her ideas using appropriate terminology.

AO2: Analyse ways in which meanings are shaped in literary texts.

The key word ‘present’ explicitly invites the student to write about the different genres of her chosen texts and, together with ‘the ways in which’, signals the need to discuss a range of authorial methods involved.

AO3: Demonstrate understanding of the significance and influence of the contexts in which literary texts are written and received.

The focus on specific relationships and on the concept of ‘the personal as political’ engages with how literary representations thereof can reflect social, cultural and historical aspects of the time period in which these texts were written.

AO4: Explore connections across literary texts.

The command words ‘compare’ and ‘contrast’ instruct the student to make connections between the texts in terms of subject matter and authorial method.

AO5: Explore literary texts informed by different interpretations.

The directive to ‘examine’ a clear viewpoint - that ‘the personal is political’ - signals the need to debate this given opinion and so to engage with multiple readings and interpretations.

Advice on writing the essay

Having completed the study of their chosen texts, researched secondary sources and devised an appropriate task, students will need guidance on how to pull their ideas together into a coherent response. Here again, exemplar student response A offers an excellent example of how to structure a sophisticated argument and the moderator commentary explains how this student achieves this. Some key points to note are:

  • this is a connective task and so students should be prepared to make connections between their texts in terms of similarity and difference throughout the response; students should make the connections they wish to explore from a range including authorial method, context, genre and critical theory
  • contexts and critical views should not be bolted on but instead should be woven through the response, evaluated as a way of reading the primary texts and then used as a stepping-stone into the development of an interesting and persuasive personal overview
  • well-selected, concise quotations should be embedded and adapted to the student’s own syntax and required meaning
  • a bibliography and academic referencing are required to indicate the secondary sources used by the student during the writing of their essay. AQA does not insist on a particular form of referencing but following the example given in the exemplar student responses would be appropriate.

Supervising and authenticating students' work

The role and responsibilities of the teacher in supervising and authenticating students’ work are set out in Section 6.1 of the specification. It is worthwhile emphasising that the teacher must confirm that each essay submitted is the work of the individual student. The JCQ (Joint Council for Qualifications) document Instructions for conducting coursework provides further guidance about the level of support and guidance that is appropriate for teachers to provide to students. In accordance with JCQ guidance, the following support would not be acceptable:

  • having reviewed the candidate’s work, giving detailed advice and suggestions as to how the work may be improved in order to meet the assessment criteria
  • giving detailed indications of errors or omissions which leave the candidate no opportunity for individual initiative
  • giving advice on specific improvements needed to meet the assessment criteria
  • providing writing frames specific to the task (e.g. outlines, paragraph headings or section headings)
  • intervening personally to improve the presentation or content of the work.
  • Awarding marks

    The role and responsibilities of teachers in submitting marks are set out in Section 6.6 of the specification. Please note that a mark out of 50 is required. This means that the mark you award against the assessment criteria, which will be out of 25, needs to be doubled when entering on the Candidate record form, before submitting marks to AQA.

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